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Research into male stigma

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  • Research into male stigma

    I am looking for Canadian men who are willing to participate in a study of stigma. Participants will be willing to talk about any negative experiences they have had due to gender stereotyping. We can communicate by e-mail or by telephone. Interviews will be kept confidential to the limits of the technology used. Please feel free to click on the link: http://www.hawkeyeassociates.ca/inde...a-research-men to review a recruitment letter explaining the project and a consent form approved by the Athabasca University Research Ethics Board. You can contact me directly at: lloyd@hawkeyeassociates.ca

  • #2
    The research that I started in 2014 on male stigma in Canada has been completed and published in the American Journal of Men's Health. Briefly, the study found stigma of two kinds directed against men as a group: 1) men are considered less responsible (or irresponsible) in matters related to the raising of children; and, 2) men are considered to be a potential threat to women and children. While these findings are not new to members of this group, this is the first academic article to study the phenomenon. The article can be found at: http://www.hawkeyeassociates.ca/imag...ale_Stigma.pdf

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Lloyd77 View Post
      The research that I started in 2014 on male stigma in Canada has been completed and published in the American Journal of Men's Health. Briefly, the study found stigma of two kinds directed against men as a group: 1) men are considered less responsible (or irresponsible) in matters related to the raising of children; and, 2) men are considered to be a potential threat to women and children. While these findings are not new to members of this group, this is the first academic article to study the phenomenon. The article can be found at: http://www.hawkeyeassociates.ca/imag...ale_Stigma.pdf
      Very interesting article. Thank you, Doctor.

      Do you mind me asking if you faced any obstacles/difficulties that might have been caused by discrimination/male stigma at any stage of this research project?
      Last edited by Equity; 07-25-2018, 08:07 PM.

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      • #4
        I experienced less resistance to this project than anticipated. Initially, I expected some problem with university ethics approval but they only insisted I change the word "sex" to "gender" (I changed it back again once the presence of a transsexual in the study made it a multi-gendered study). I later did a presentation on the project to a student/faculty meeting at that same university and received considerable support particularly from male students. After the article was published, the president's office of this university distributed the article to the staff and their media contact list which was an unexpected nice touch.

        I anticipated some difficulty getting published. I selected a journal specializing in men's health and received a rejection e-mail from the editor in three days. The speed of this response was unheard of. It generally takes editors weeks if not months to get back to you. The response letter said the study did not conform with existing research. Since there has been not previous academic research into male stigma, what the editor was really saying, IMHO, was that the results of my study did not conform to existing (feminist) suppositions. So I decided to submit the manuscript to Canadian journals because, after all, the study was on Canadian subjects.

        There is a process for submitting double-blind peer reviewed manuscripts that takes several hours. I completed my submission by 8:30 P.M one evening. I received the rejection letter from the editor by 9:00 AM the following morning. I got the sense it might be difficult to publish this piece. So I sent it to a journal whose editor I knew personally. It was sent of for review, a process that normally takes around four months. After the reviews were returned I received another rejection e-mail. Normally the reviewer's comments are sent to the author whether the paper is accepted for publication or not, but this time I had to ask for them. The reviewer's comments revealed some skepticism that stigma against men was possible. But the comments were valuable because I was able to see how it would be attacked and I was able to strengthen the article accordingly.

        I then did an internet search for all of the academic journals on the planet that might have an interest in the topic. Of the forty or so journals I found, the American Journal of Men's Health was the top rated. The problem was they are open access which means they are free to the public but they charge the author (or the author's university) a publishing fee of a couple of thousand dollars. I am semi-retired teaching only one graduate class and my university does not give publishing support. On hearing this the journal waived their publishing fee! During the whole process (which normally takes up to a year), they were extremely supportive and helpful.

        As I mentioned, my university sent this article out to their media list. The Canadian Association for Equality based out of Toronto also sent out a press release to their media list. I did not receive one interview. This surprised me because I thought this would be a hot topic with the MeToo movement and all. While none of this proves discrimination, I can tell you that I have published 20 academic papers and the reaction to this one has been unusual. People are either supportive or hostile. There is no neutrality. Thanks for asking Equity.

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