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  • Internet Safety Lessons

    Does anyone else see a kind of feminist indoctrination in the way Internet safety is taught? I never really looked at this from an MRA perspective, until the other day there was an Internet safety lesson at work (and to be clear, the lesson had absolutely nothing to do with the job).

    I've had several full lessons on Internet safety, as well as a few short lectures, as well as occasional mentions of it citing details. What I've just recently realised is that the examples of Internet stalking are almost always a male committing sexual crimes against a female, usually a young girl, and sometimes even a girl as young as 10 years old.

    From all the lessons I've had, I've spotted the typical scenario: an older man disguises as someone younger and chats up an innocent and chaste but attractive young girl, which alone is stupid because they're are an uncountable number of non-chaste females on the Internet. He then befriends her and tries to extract her personal information, and later tries to track her down, then either rape her, sexually assault her, get her to take her clothes off, or any other sexual crime.

    Each example is different, but you'd be lucky if you saw an example of a male victim of Internet stalking crimes, let alone a female perpetrator. And if you are lucky enough to see a male victim, it will probably be a homosexual male perpetrator.

    What's more is that they try to exaggerate the situation to make it seem like the majority of people online are stalkers. This is very similar to the rape situation where they try to paint the majority of men as rapists. I've heard people make ridiculous claims such as the idea that posting your eye colour will make it easy for people to spot you.

    Although these stuff are taught to both genders, most of this is really just a form of feminist indoctrination. The real message here is not to keep yourself safe online, but to suspect all males. Sure, they teach you to suspect females too, but their primary reason for that is that they could actually be males in disguise.

    Does anyone else have this problem with Internet safety lessons, or was it just a coincidence that all the lessons I've received are feminist indoctrination. I understand Internet safety is a real issue (despite the horrible exaggerations they make about it), so it's a shame they teach it that way.

    I bet the only reason they don't explicitly mention it as a male-on-female gender issue is because not doing so would teach men and boys to suspect each other. The only surprise I have is that feminists aren't screaming "don't tell us what to do on the Internet, teach men not to stalk us!".

  • #2
    RE: Internet Safety Lessons

    "don't tell us what to do on the Internet, teach men not to stalk us!"

    I wouldn't be giving them any ideas! What you stated for the most part is true. Of course they don't tell you about the women who caused a young boy to commit suicide by pretending to be someone she was not. That happened a few years ago when myspace was big but I have no doubt its happening much more then we are being told.

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    • #3
      RE: Internet Safety Lessons

      I really have to agree that the amount of emphasis put on male perpetrator/female victim portrayed stalking/abuse on the internet is overstated and directs attention away from the real issue which is adult perpetrator/child victim stalking/abuse. An adult man or woman should have the sense of mind to take precautions to avoid harm from internet stalkers but a child probably won't. I'm not a parent but if I were I would be very attentive to any online relationships that my children might have with adults. In my opinion, it simply is not appropriate for an adult to have a peer to peer relationship with a child. The only appropriate dynamic for an adult to have with a child or adolescent is an adult to child dynamic, by which I mean adults shouldn't be buddies with a child or adolescent.

      Summary/tldr: The social norm should be children need special protection from predatory actions of adults instead of women/girls need special protections from men.

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      • #4
        RE: Internet Safety Lessons

        It's the same with sexual misconduct between teachers and students. A vast majority of perpetrators are women(a much higher percentage are math teachers too.,...), and they have relations with teen or younger boys. However almost all training on it when i was in school to become a teacher was oriented towards protecting boys and girls from male offenders.
        My favorite MRA: Girl Writes What

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        • #5
          RE: Internet Safety Lessons

          Originally posted by yennedtrebor
          It's the same with sexual misconduct between teachers and students. A vast majority of perpetrators are women(a much higher percentage are math teachers too.,...), and they have relations with teen or younger boys. However almost all training on it when i was in school to become a teacher was oriented towards protecting boys and girls from male offenders.
          Well, at least they try to protect both boys and girls and not just girls... but it's still a huge problem.

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          • #6
            RE: Internet Safety Lessons

            Originally posted by Zerbu
            Does anyone else see a kind of feminist indoctrination in the way Internet safety is taught? I never really looked at this from an MRA perspective, until the other day there was an Internet safety lesson at work (and to be clear, the lesson had absolutely nothing to do with the job).

            I've had several full lessons on Internet safety, as well as a few short lectures, as well as occasional mentions of it citing details. What I've just recently realised is that the examples of Internet stalking are almost always a male committing sexual crimes against a female, usually a young girl, and sometimes even a girl as young as 10 years old.

            From all the lessons I've had, I've spotted the typical scenario: an older man disguises as someone younger and chats up an innocent and chaste but attractive young girl, which alone is stupid because they're are an uncountable number of non-chaste females on the Internet. He then befriends her and tries to extract her personal information, and later tries to track her down, then either rape her, sexually assault her, get her to take her clothes off, or any other sexual crime.

            Each example is different, but you'd be lucky if you saw an example of a male victim of Internet stalking crimes, let alone a female perpetrator. And if you are lucky enough to see a male victim, it will probably be a homosexual male perpetrator.

            What's more is that they try to exaggerate the situation to make it seem like the majority of people online are stalkers. This is very similar to the rape situation where they try to paint the majority of men as rapists. I've heard people make ridiculous claims such as the idea that posting your eye colour will make it easy for people to spot you.

            Although these stuff are taught to both genders, most of this is really just a form of feminist indoctrination. The real message here is not to keep yourself safe online, but to suspect all males. Sure, they teach you to suspect females too, but their primary reason for that is that they could actually be males in disguise.

            Does anyone else have this problem with Internet safety lessons, or was it just a coincidence that all the lessons I've received are feminist indoctrination. I understand Internet safety is a real issue (despite the horrible exaggerations they make about it), so it's a shame they teach it that way.

            I bet the only reason they don't explicitly mention it as a male-on-female gender issue is because not doing so would teach men and boys to suspect each other. The only surprise I have is that feminists aren't screaming "don't tell us what to do on the Internet, teach men not to stalk us!".
            You are 100% on point Zerbu. Males are always painted as the aggressors on the internet despite studies showing just as many female predators use the internet for the same nefarious purpose.

            Male=bad
            Female=good.

            Same shit, different medium.
            De oppresso liber

            Comment


            • #7
              RE: Internet Safety Lessons

              Originally posted by yennedtrebor
              It's the same with sexual misconduct between teachers and students. A vast majority of perpetrators are women(a much higher percentage are math teachers too.,...), and they have relations with teen or younger boys. However almost all training on it when i was in school to become a teacher was oriented towards protecting boys and girls from male offenders.
              Do you have any numbers on the math teacher thing, As that just seems odd most are female math teachers. I would not have thought one group of teachers that teach a particular subject be more like to go after male students.

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              • #8
                RE: Internet Safety Lessons

                I do not believe that anyone has actually compiled data on this as it's probably not considered relevant. But as a teacher I follow these kinds of things in the news, and not only is it occurring vastly more with female teachers, but also math teachers... maybe I should find every article I can on teacher sex abuse and make a database:P
                My favorite MRA: Girl Writes What

                Comment


                • #9
                  RE: Internet Safety Lessons

                  Originally posted by Zerbu
                  Does anyone else have this problem with Internet safety lessons, or was it just a coincidence that all the lessons I've received are feminist indoctrination. I understand Internet safety is a real issue (despite the horrible exaggerations they make about it), so it's a shame they teach it that way.
                  I go with feminist indoctrination here. Tho on the actual topic of it, I think you may be surprise at how easy it is to circumvent ones security online just from social engineering. Yes the number of incidents are not huge, but the chances of it happening are.
                  [hr]
                  Originally posted by yennedtrebor
                  I do not believe that anyone has actually compiled data on this as it's probably not considered relevant. But as a teacher I follow these kinds of things in the news, and not only is it occurring vastly more with female teachers, but also math teachers... maybe I should find every article I can on teacher sex abuse and make a database:P
                  You should. Tho I take it further and include male teachers as well for comparison sake. At the very least do a sample pool and see what turns up. It should be pretty interesting say the least.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    RE: Internet Safety Lessons

                    What I've just recently realised [sic] is that the examples of Internet stalking are almost always a male committing sexual crimes against a female, usually a young girl, and sometimes even a girl as young as 10 years old.
                    Let's not go down the feminist path here. Just because we don't like something doesn't mean it isn't true. It should at least be a discussion whether the differences between male sexuality and female sexuality make abnormal predators from both sexes behave differently. But that might not even be the discussion we need to have.

                    It may be the case that women primarily exploit nearby boys and children, whereas men must "travel" for their perverse exploits. Part of that may be due to the fact that every man is already subjected to more suspicion regarding children and adolescents.

                    Plus it's notable that male predators tend to leave more signs of an assault. Breaking a hymen or tearing rectal tissue is not a bloodless affair. Women on the other hand are more capable of acting on their predatory impulses without leaving many traces beyond DNA. As a result, which one is capable of going next door and committing an atrocity with greater chance for escaping consequence? Who needs to use the anonymity of the internet more?

                    So for all sorts of reasons it may be the case that the vast majority of online predators are male child molesters or rapists. This says nothing about men in general. It says a lot about how much misplaced trust we grant women in general and how our efforts to ferret out male predators, regardless of whether the ends justify the means, are working.

                    It is just as illegal for a woman to exploit a young boy or girl on the internet as it is for a man. Our society may have a horrific cultural exchange when it comes to female abnormal predators but those predators are penalized. Damn near every month we get new stories about female abnormal predators sexually manipulating their students, dependents, children and so on. We get very few reports about women doing this via the internet, unless I just haven't picked those up on my cultural radar.

                    But I can say this, I was a minor once and a 40 year old woman from the internet chatted me up about child porn after meeting her. Women can definitely be pedophiles. I've met one. It happens, it does exist but I can't speculate on whether the online aspect of this is as prolific.

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                    • #11
                      RE: Internet Safety Lessons

                      Okay, first of all, if you read the previous posts on this thread, it has already been stated that most instances are female-on-male. It's just as illegal for a woman to do it as a man? Well that's certainly not the case when it comes to teachers molesting students, and I naturally assume the same applies to Internet pedophilia.

                      Furthermore, my thread was about far more than just who is the majority of perpetrators. It was also about how they try to paint it as if almost all males on the Internet are predators, and almost all females are males in disguise.

                      And even if the majority of Internet predators are male, why make every example male on female if there's plenty of cases where the female was the perpetrator?

                      Also, I wonder why other than feminist indoctrination they would randomly give Internet safety lessons where they were completely irrelevent.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        RE: Internet Safety Lessons

                        Hey Insurgent,

                        I think this whole issue is entirely overly complicated. I really think that evidence showing whether males or females are more likely to be an online sexual predator is irrelevant. I'm going to make a controversial claim that I would love for someone to refute because I'm not sure it's bulletproof. In an online setting adults have no business forming a relationship with a child they do not already know. I'm not saying an adult shouldn't interact with a child online but you shouldn't try to become "friends" with them. I honestly think it's absurd for an adult to try and form a peer to peer relationship with a child in any setting. The only appropriate relationship would be an adult to child one, which is more like a mentor to student dynamic. Having said that, I think one of the better approaches to protecting children isn't by warning them to be careful around men, rather we should tell them to be careful of any particular attention they get from adults who they meet online. I plan to vet any online friends my children make when they get old enough to start using the internet.

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