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Jordan Peterson, Maps of Meaning

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  • Jordan Peterson, Maps of Meaning

    JPB is all the rage these days. That being said, like a lot f others, I'm looking back at his earlier work. Is Maps of Meaning worth the price? Amazon wants $53 USD for it. Was that the original price or is it price inflation due to all of the hype.

    Has anyone read it already?
    I used to think collapse was inevitable. Now I realize it is necessary.

    It was only a matter of time before the bicycles realized that they in fact did not need the fish.

  • #2
    jesus 53 $ is huge. guess prices went up. it was 12 $ like 8 months ago when i checked..should have bought it ;[
    Originally posted by MatrixTransform
    where were you before you put yourself last?
    Originally posted by TheNarrator
    Everywhere I travel, tiny life. Single-serving sugar, single-serving cream, single pat of butter. The microwave Cordon Bleu hobby kit. Shampoo-conditioner combos, sample-packaged mouthwash, tiny bars of soap. The people I meet on each flight? They're single-serving friends.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi,

      before you spend the money, why not check out JBP's youtube lecture series on MoM?

      Anyway, MoM's been on my bookshelf for decades, and now it contains more penned-in notes than actual print.
      It is a good book; indeed a very good book.
      However, it is a book on a specialized subject, namely epistemology.

      JBP's thesis is very simple: the world is not (not only, not primarily ...) an arena for knowing, it is (also, just as much, if not more) an arena for doing.
      The need to do, to act, to perform, to achieve establishes some different demands and requirements wrt. what knowledge is: it requires "subjective" knowledge,
      as opposed to "objctive" knowledge, mere data. This subjective knowledge roughly corresponds to the "theory" we use to elevate any set of observations and data
      to actual information, something relevant, explanatory, prognostic.

      Accepting subjective knowledge leads to the paradox category of knowledge that is "untrue, but helpful".
      Like, an attitude that it's a good thing to die in battle helps you overcome fear and thus helps you to survive in battle.

      This is where you find worlds full of "meaning", as opposed to "truth". This is where you find ideologies and creeds of all kinds.
      And what JBP is saying is that we cannot escape living in a world of meaning, so make sure your meanings are good ones.
      We cannot escape living in a world of ideology, or conviction, so make sure yours is a good one.

      And just like we can structure objective knowledge, JBP goes on to describe categories for structuring subjective knowledge.
      He finds much of this in myth, and traces myth back to semi-freudian, or if not that, then for sure Jungian psychological archetypes.
      He also shows how these structures have been present throughout history, and show themselves in e.g. art and litterature.

      You will have trouble with JBP if you
      - totally reject the possibility of "subjective knowledge", or "private" or "personal" knowledge
      - totally reject any approach to epistemology that includes constructivist traits
      - totally reject a Jungian approach to psychology
      - totally reject psychology as a tool for understanding the world

      I myself am not a great fan of Jung, and so I found JBPs detailed mapping of Jung onto the world, and vice versa, a bit tiresome.
      But that is a matter of detail in later chapters. Just for the fresh approach to how we "do" knowledge, I found the book of immense value.

      I'd like to end by waving the standard of what a true academic, a true intellectual is: someone who has studied a subject to the very depths and the end of sources. A guy who can do a 600 pound theory lift with one hand. A guy who can look out over a vast landscape of detail and see the hills and valleys, the trees as well as the forest. A guy, when faced with a silly BBC interviewer, doesn't have his hackles raised by Newman's enormous impoliteness, but coolly sees at a glance where her question is coming from, what is implied in its falsehood, and hence can at once strike to the very core of the issue, the one single point that will, as Spinoza said of light, show not only the truth of the light, but will also show up the darkness surrounding it. For he didn't just counter every one of Newman's points, he also simultaneously revealed them as shallow, uninformed and dishonest.
      Good work

      M

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm a fan of Peterson and Jung, although I don't know Jung well enough to say that concretely. I watch the videos, but I also like to read. I find taking in information in more than one format to be helpful. I may wait a month and see if the price comes back down. I wonder if he sells it cheaper directly from his website. I'll dig a bit and post what I find.
        I used to think collapse was inevitable. Now I realize it is necessary.

        It was only a matter of time before the bicycles realized that they in fact did not need the fish.

        Comment


        • #5
          Well, that didn't take long. JBP is the man. Here is a link to the pdf of maps of meaning. It is freely available from his website.
          I used to think collapse was inevitable. Now I realize it is necessary.

          It was only a matter of time before the bicycles realized that they in fact did not need the fish.

          Comment


          • #6
            OK, links don't seem to be working correctly anymore. Here it is in text:

            http://jordanbpeterson.com/wp-conten...ledge-1999.pdf
            I used to think collapse was inevitable. Now I realize it is necessary.

            It was only a matter of time before the bicycles realized that they in fact did not need the fish.

            Comment

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