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  • Meeting Jordan Peterson

    On the 19th I'll be heading to Den Haag. I'll be attending the so called Great Dutch Roomcleaning event hosted by Dutch Lion. While there, not only will I listen to Dr. Jordan Peterson speak, but I'll also have dinner with him (and everyone else who paid extra). I'm guessing I'll probably be the only one involved in the mrm to attend, so I wanted to ask if any of you had any questions / talking points you'd bring up should you have been in my position. I'm currently in the middle of my exams, which will be done by Wednesday. I'll post my own questions at that time.

  • #2
    jordan is very right leaning and very much a hero of mine.

    however he has the blinders on when it comes to any mens rights issues. he is in a loving relationship which isnt likely to change... he's in a very good situation and he's not likely to realize how fortunate he is.

    he might say "im very fortunate" but he will never realize HOW much. not trully. and his interest will never lie in knowing more.
    Originally posted by MatrixTransform
    where were you before you put yourself last?
    Originally posted by TheNarrator
    Everywhere I travel, tiny life. Single-serving sugar, single-serving cream, single pat of butter. The microwave Cordon Bleu hobby kit. Shampoo-conditioner combos, sample-packaged mouthwash, tiny bars of soap. The people I meet on each flight? They're single-serving friends.

    Comment


    • #3
      Point taken, though that's hardly a question

      Comment


      • #4
        yeah i just mean theres nothing i'd have to ask him.

        maybe my question would be
        "why are you in such denial about the state of the law regarding men. society vilifies men, i see you as a true rare intellectual in our time of darkness but this is one subject you are blind to, do you think its because your marriage is good for you?"
        Originally posted by MatrixTransform
        where were you before you put yourself last?
        Originally posted by TheNarrator
        Everywhere I travel, tiny life. Single-serving sugar, single-serving cream, single pat of butter. The microwave Cordon Bleu hobby kit. Shampoo-conditioner combos, sample-packaged mouthwash, tiny bars of soap. The people I meet on each flight? They're single-serving friends.

        Comment


        • #5
          Which whiskey is better Irish or Scotch?

          ...because I will buy him a bottle and we can toast over the corpse of PC bullshit

          to no bullshit. Slainte
          "Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one" - Charles Mackay

          And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee. - Donne

          "What we are seeing in this headless misandry is a grand display of the Tyranny of the Underdog: 'I am a wretchedly longstanding victim; therefore I own no burden of adult accountability, nor need to honor any restraint against my words and actions. In fact, all efforts to restrain me are only further proof of my oppressed condition.'
          "It is the most perfect trump-card against accountable living ever devised." - Gladden Schrock

          "What remains for most men in modern life is a world of expectation without reward, burden without honor and service without self" - Paul Elam

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MatrixTransform View Post
            Which whiskey is better Irish or Scotch?

            ...because I will buy him a bottle and we can toast over the corpse of PC bullshit

            to no bullshit. Slainte

            lol the best whiskey is tequila..obviously ;]
            Originally posted by MatrixTransform
            where were you before you put yourself last?
            Originally posted by TheNarrator
            Everywhere I travel, tiny life. Single-serving sugar, single-serving cream, single pat of butter. The microwave Cordon Bleu hobby kit. Shampoo-conditioner combos, sample-packaged mouthwash, tiny bars of soap. The people I meet on each flight? They're single-serving friends.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by TheNarrator View Post
              ... is tequila..obviously
              Hmmm, Margarita !
              "Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one" - Charles Mackay

              And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee. - Donne

              "What we are seeing in this headless misandry is a grand display of the Tyranny of the Underdog: 'I am a wretchedly longstanding victim; therefore I own no burden of adult accountability, nor need to honor any restraint against my words and actions. In fact, all efforts to restrain me are only further proof of my oppressed condition.'
              "It is the most perfect trump-card against accountable living ever devised." - Gladden Schrock

              "What remains for most men in modern life is a world of expectation without reward, burden without honor and service without self" - Paul Elam

              Comment


              • #8


                matrix. i need to mail you this. lol
                Originally posted by MatrixTransform
                where were you before you put yourself last?
                Originally posted by TheNarrator
                Everywhere I travel, tiny life. Single-serving sugar, single-serving cream, single pat of butter. The microwave Cordon Bleu hobby kit. Shampoo-conditioner combos, sample-packaged mouthwash, tiny bars of soap. The people I meet on each flight? They're single-serving friends.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'd use the following video as a jumping off point:



                  So my question would be:

                  "Dr. Peterson, you have said that the MGTOW movement have a point about societies anti-male bias, but I think it is fair to say you believe they take it a bridge too far. If That is an accurate summary of your viewpoint, what then do you recommend for young men as a strategy to both find fulfillment in their relationships while protecting themselves from the modern feminism influenced legal machine that can and will destroy them if the mate he selects ever decides she's "unhappy"?"
                  I used to think collapse was inevitable. Now I realize it is necessary.

                  It was only a matter of time before the bicycles realized that they in fact did not need the fish.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So here are a few questions I've thought up after todays exam. Feel free to nitpick, debate, or add something to the arguments.

                    1. The EU has tricked most people into thinking they and their countries would be nothing without it. At the same time it is anti-democratic and lacks any kind of transparancy. To me, it seems to resemble an abusive partner. In such a simile, we might be the voice in the back of ones head telling them to get out of that situation. How can we, a loose collection of simple citizens, achieve anything in fighting such totalitarian entities?

                    This one is relevant because I'll be meeting him at a convention that seeks to question the EU, among other things.

                    2. You spoke in a q&a video about promoting virtue and cultivating morality. But I rarely meet people who are purposefully doing the opposite. I like to tell myself I’m improving at following my own principles, but is that even the point? How do we determine whether or not we’re doing virtue and morality correctly? And perhaps more importantly, how do we recognize when we’re going the wrong way?

                    This one is relevant to his general message. Probably one that everyone in the crowd will have an interest in.

                    3. I’ve always wanted to study history, I’m watching, reading or listening to something history related on a daily basis. I know many people who are historians or archaeologists. Yet, they seem to think that history is only beneficial on a personal basis, not a societal. My answer to that is that society is made up of persons, and to improve one is to improve the other. I find that people have an atrocious understanding of history. Being unfamiliar with the past they have a warped view of the present, which dictates their actions As a future high school teacher, I’d like to see much more attention being paid to history in school. Would you agree? If so, how do you recommend it be implemented ?

                    A bit more practical, less esoteric, and of selfish importance to me.

                    I was going to write another question about religion for the sake of being complete. I didn't think I'd pick it since I don't imagine this is a topic that many people will be interested in. Anyway, while writing it turned into a short tangent, so I'll just post it here.

                    You often give atheïsts a hard time for criticizing or mocking christianity as a historical or otherwise literal document, claiming it to be psychological. While I do see the reason in this, I put it to you that a large number of christians have not considered your views, if not most of them. In fact, the way faith is commonly spoken about points in that direction. For example, when christians talk about hell, it’s usually not as a place we create for ourselves, but as a geographical/ethereal place. It’s a line of thinking you’ve mocked yourself, yet you reprimand atheïsts for doing the same. It’s not a strawman view of Christianity because it’s a rather popular one. Moreover you’ve stated that atheïsts are that way is because they are running away from responsibility. Even within your psychological narrative, I find this statement to be completely insane. Atheïsts are workers, caretakers, students, and soldiers just like everyone else. Whatever responsibility you’re describing, they don’t seem to have any less of it than your average christian. I can’t speak for Canada or the US, but here in Europe, Atheïsm isn’t a fad, it’s the default. As an agnostic, when I open the bible, I’m not terrified of the imagine it shows me of humanity or intimidated by the burden of fixing myself accordingly. Many parts of the bible have little to nothing to do with that, yet every word in it is supposed to be the truth, as it was passed down by God. If Western civilization is built upon christian values, then can’t we just take those values with us while we ditch the silly stories about Solomon’s concubines or the laws that forbid clothing from more than one fabric? You also dismiss certain critics of christianity on the basis of them having been abused as children. As if that’s not a valid reason. I was abused as a child and those events did put me on a track to rejecting my faith. Am I the unreasonable one ? There’s something I notice in the attitudes of religious people that differs from those outside their faith. My best friend is a muslim, and he might say something like “those people arn’t muslim, because Islam has values and they don’t follow it » Which might be a christians reply to tales of misconduct within the various churches. What they don’t understand is that to people outside their faith those stated values don’t mean a thing, they get judged on their behavior. On how they act out their beliefs, as you often put it. If it turns out that many christians seem to act out their faith in abusive ways then that’s something for christians to work on, not for others to shut up about.

                    My MRM question would be in line with what Pbisque provided. I think I'll add that people in the MRM generally seem to like him quite a bit, but feel abandoned. Oddly enough, trad-cons across the western world seem to enjoy playing the game of man bad woman weak, and pin the blame on men when an increasing amount of children grow up without a father. It might be a better idea to bring this up somewhere during the dinner, rather than as a question after the lecture. Though maybe you think that might be letting him off the hook.

                    your thoughts?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't worry about keeping him on the hook. Keep it friendly. Get honest answers to honest questions.
                      I used to think collapse was inevitable. Now I realize it is necessary.

                      It was only a matter of time before the bicycles realized that they in fact did not need the fish.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kris View Post
                        So here are a few questions I've thought up after todays exam. Feel free to nitpick, debate, or add something to the arguments.

                        1. The EU has tricked most people into thinking they and their countries would be nothing without it. At the same time it is anti-democratic and lacks any kind of transparancy. To me, it seems to resemble an abusive partner. In such a simile, we might be the voice in the back of ones head telling them to get out of that situation. How can we, a loose collection of simple citizens, achieve anything in fighting such totalitarian entities?

                        This one is relevant because I'll be meeting him at a convention that seeks to question the EU, among other things.

                        2. You spoke in a q&a video about promoting virtue and cultivating morality. But I rarely meet people who are purposefully doing the opposite. I like to tell myself I’m improving at following my own principles, but is that even the point? How do we determine whether or not we’re doing virtue and morality correctly? And perhaps more importantly, how do we recognize when we’re going the wrong way?

                        This one is relevant to his general message. Probably one that everyone in the crowd will have an interest in.

                        3. I’ve always wanted to study history, I’m watching, reading or listening to something history related on a daily basis. I know many people who are historians or archaeologists. Yet, they seem to think that history is only beneficial on a personal basis, not a societal. My answer to that is that society is made up of persons, and to improve one is to improve the other. I find that people have an atrocious understanding of history. Being unfamiliar with the past they have a warped view of the present, which dictates their actions As a future high school teacher, I’d like to see much more attention being paid to history in school. Would you agree? If so, how do you recommend it be implemented ?

                        A bit more practical, less esoteric, and of selfish importance to me.

                        I was going to write another question about religion for the sake of being complete. I didn't think I'd pick it since I don't imagine this is a topic that many people will be interested in. Anyway, while writing it turned into a short tangent, so I'll just post it here.

                        You often give atheïsts a hard time for criticizing or mocking christianity as a historical or otherwise literal document, claiming it to be psychological. While I do see the reason in this, I put it to you that a large number of christians have not considered your views, if not most of them. In fact, the way faith is commonly spoken about points in that direction. For example, when christians talk about hell, it’s usually not as a place we create for ourselves, but as a geographical/ethereal place. It’s a line of thinking you’ve mocked yourself, yet you reprimand atheïsts for doing the same. It’s not a strawman view of Christianity because it’s a rather popular one. Moreover you’ve stated that atheïsts are that way is because they are running away from responsibility. Even within your psychological narrative, I find this statement to be completely insane. Atheïsts are workers, caretakers, students, and soldiers just like everyone else. Whatever responsibility you’re describing, they don’t seem to have any less of it than your average christian. I can’t speak for Canada or the US, but here in Europe, Atheïsm isn’t a fad, it’s the default. As an agnostic, when I open the bible, I’m not terrified of the imagine it shows me of humanity or intimidated by the burden of fixing myself accordingly. Many parts of the bible have little to nothing to do with that, yet every word in it is supposed to be the truth, as it was passed down by God. If Western civilization is built upon christian values, then can’t we just take those values with us while we ditch the silly stories about Solomon’s concubines or the laws that forbid clothing from more than one fabric? You also dismiss certain critics of christianity on the basis of them having been abused as children. As if that’s not a valid reason. I was abused as a child and those events did put me on a track to rejecting my faith. Am I the unreasonable one ? There’s something I notice in the attitudes of religious people that differs from those outside their faith. My best friend is a muslim, and he might say something like “those people arn’t muslim, because Islam has values and they don’t follow it » Which might be a christians reply to tales of misconduct within the various churches. What they don’t understand is that to people outside their faith those stated values don’t mean a thing, they get judged on their behavior. On how they act out their beliefs, as you often put it. If it turns out that many christians seem to act out their faith in abusive ways then that’s something for christians to work on, not for others to shut up about.

                        My MRM question would be in line with what Pbisque provided. I think I'll add that people in the MRM generally seem to like him quite a bit, but feel abandoned. Oddly enough, trad-cons across the western world seem to enjoy playing the game of man bad woman weak, and pin the blame on men when an increasing amount of children grow up without a father. It might be a better idea to bring this up somewhere during the dinner, rather than as a question after the lecture. Though maybe you think that might be letting him off the hook.

                        your thoughts?
                        All of the above topics are worth their own 10 video series from JBP; and I, for one would be pretty pissed if I had to answer them inbetween mouthfuls of my dinner. Something short and sweet, yet important, would be more polite, at least.
                        I think you touch on it with "I think I'll add that people in the MRM generally seem to like him quite a bit, but feel abandoned."
                        The MHRM needs a figurehead, a face, a spokesperson.
                        Not that JBP should be it, but he might have some insights as to why no such person is coming forward.

                        M

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Still going with Scotch, Irish... or Tequila
                          "Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one" - Charles Mackay

                          And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee. - Donne

                          "What we are seeing in this headless misandry is a grand display of the Tyranny of the Underdog: 'I am a wretchedly longstanding victim; therefore I own no burden of adult accountability, nor need to honor any restraint against my words and actions. In fact, all efforts to restrain me are only further proof of my oppressed condition.'
                          "It is the most perfect trump-card against accountable living ever devised." - Gladden Schrock

                          "What remains for most men in modern life is a world of expectation without reward, burden without honor and service without self" - Paul Elam

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            These questions were not meant to be asked during dinner, but after his talk when he answers crowd questions like he always does. Only the first three are to be considered, but since this is a discussion forum I decided to post everything I came up with. The MRM topic will be talked about during dinner, then. In as tactful a way as I can manage.

                            Also, I'll buy the man something. Maybe some Belgian beer and chocolates...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              look for his interview with Dave Rubin. I think in it, they talk about how he is a fan of gin. Watch the vid to make sure i got that right.
                              I used to think collapse was inevitable. Now I realize it is necessary.

                              It was only a matter of time before the bicycles realized that they in fact did not need the fish.

                              Comment

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